Exhibition

THE NON VEG ART SHOW

Date : 24 October, 2013 to 06 November, 2013

The Non-Veg art show is a space of transgression. Of pushing the limits. And tinkering with the boundaries, as well. This is why it is edgy. How much of media one should consume is something that one seriously needs to ask. However, like a few other significant queries, this one, too, remains unanswered. If saying is believing, then the act of saying (something) turns into a political stance. It's not the usual murky field of partisan politics. The politics of conformity propels the act of (non) saying. The act of manufactured silence, in other words.

And this is precisely where the Non-Veg Art show seeks to intervene. With the surrounding being increasingly taken over by the axioms churned out by the media, series of (non) truths continue to pose themselves as sermons a priori. This particular show dares to take the lid off and make us stare down the barrel. The sheen of happiness under the incandescent media juggernaut is undermined by the works of three artists who, by profession are media-practitioners. Hence, they are ‘positional’ly equipped to demand a deconstruction.

The post-modern era, despite different odds and evils it carries within, has taught us to defy the grand narratives. Still, the spectres of truth keep coming back, often in the form of brands. That truth is reflected in the brand we consume. Contesting this brand fetish needs to have a sidewinder. Sidewinder, in both senses of the term. It's a heavy blow. And, one should look for the original meaning of the noun, too, i.e. a small rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes) that moves by a distinctive lateral looping motion of its body and has two hornlike scaly projections above its eyes. It's something to be wary of.

 

The aspiration to live in a well branded ‘American Dreams’ has created a false bubble of apparently happy modern lifestyle. The hollow desire to follow western trends blindly has been directly reflected in the changing food habits of the urban Indians. A conscious effort to shrug off the deep-rooted culinary traditions has resulted in a rootless entity. 


Our very idea of food is to some extent determined by the culture in which we are brought up. Food habit changes with the environment and culture of the land. However, media and advertising clearly have a huge impact on developing food habit. In recent years concerns have been raised about food advertising aimed at children because of the possible harm it induces.
Indians are getting as fat as the West: Obesity crisis is on a rise among Indians specially young and the middle aged as they are choosing Western fast food over traditional cuisine.

 

The Non-Veg show dares to sensationalize the mindless desire to follow the trends blindly. It dares to negotiate with the uncomfortable self that is, more often than not, thrown under the carpet. As Elliot famously asked, “Do we dare disturb the universe?” This art show, with all humility, does.

It can't afford to be veggie. To be politically correct is out of question as well. It's disturbingly transgressive. Being non-veg is the only option.

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